Mahindra Scorpio vs Tata Safari Storme Comparison

Tata Safari Storme vs Mahindra Scorpio Comparison Review:


"Meanwhile, Tata Motors' products got more and more complicated, especially the failure prone electricals became the Achilles heel of Tata products. Today Tata Motors has a lot of catching up to do, especially in terms of Customer Service provided by its thick-skinned dealers."

Safari Storme vs Scorpio Video Comparison:


Pricing & Features:
The range-topping, Safari Storme ‘VX 4x2’, (manual) costs 16.5 Lakh Rs, on road, Delhi, which is around 60,000 rupees more expensive, than Scorpio's ‘S10’ 2WD-manual variant costing 15.9 Lakh. Scorpio S10 has a long list of extra features over the Safari Storme VX, like Automatic Climate Control, Tyre Pressure Monitoring System, LED DRLs, Touchscreen, Navigation, Automatic Rain Sensing Wipers, Automatic Light Sensing Headlamps, Auto-up Anti-pinch Driver’s Window and Cornering Lamps. The Storme has only one extra feature that is absent in the Scorpio, which is its Electrically Folding Mirrors.

Pricing of other variants: 
Scorpio ‘S10 2WD AT’ costs 17.2 Lakh Rs.
Safari Storme VX 4x4 (manual) costs 18.1 Lakh Rs.
Scorpio ‘S10 4WD’ (manual) costs 17.3 Lakh Rs.
on road, Delhi

Common Features: ABS, Airbags-2, AC, Power Steering, Power Windows, Central Locking by Remote, Alloys, Fog Lamps, Projector Headlamps, Infotainment System: FM, USB, Aux, Bluetooth + 4 Speakers, Steering Wheel Switches, Parking Sensors, Height Adjustable Driver’s Seat, Electrically Adjustable Mirrors, Cruise Control, Rear Wash-Wipe-Defog

Extra Features in Scorpio (S10): Automatic Climate Control, Tyre Pressure Monitoring System, LED DRLs, Touchscreen, Navigation, Automatic Rain Sensing Wipers, Automatic Light Sensing Headlamps, Auto-up Anti-pinch Driver’s Window, Cornering Lamps

Extra Features in Safari (VX): Electrically Folding Mirrors

Performance & Drivability: 
The Safari Storme looks quite impressive on paper, but fails to display the same enthusiasm on tarmac. Tata has turned on the turbo to the max, giving it massive amounts of turbo lag below 2000 rpm. This makes it quite cumbersome to drive in city traffic. The Scorpio on the other hand has gone for a more sensibly sized turbocharger, which spools up at just 1200 rpm, making it a cinch to drive during city commutes. Both engines have a potent mid-range, with Safari’s higher torque output giving it an edge over the Scorpio while overtaking heavy vehicles on the highway. Both engines are reasonably refined and free revving, which is a welcome departure from the older engines that used to power the predecessors of these two cars.

Power to Weight Ratio (PS/ton): Safari Storme - 77, Scorpio – 66 (difference 17%)
Torque to Weight Ratio (Nm/ton): Safari Storme - 199, Scorpio – 154 (difference 30%) 

Power (PS@rpm): Safari Storme - 156@4000, Scorpio – 120@4000
Torque (Nm@rpm): Safari Storme – 400@1750-2500, Scorpio – 280@1800-2800
Kerb Weight (kg): Safari Storme - 2015, Scorpio – 1820

Fuel Efficiency: 
The Safari Storme, has an ARAI certified mileage of 13.9 kmpl, which is 1.5 kmpl less than the Scorpio, having a fuel efficiency of 15.4 kmpl. In our back-to-back tests, the Scorpio was almost 1 kmpl more efficient than the Safari Storme.

ARAI Mileage (kmpl): 
Safari Storme – 13.9, Scorpio (manual) – 15.4 (difference 1.5)

Fuel Cost for 75,000 km (in Lakh): 
Safari Storme – 4.10, Scorpio (manual) – 3.70

Space & Comfort: 
In spite of their ginormous dimensions, both these cars have disappointing space inside their cabins. Safari Storme has a slight advantage over the Scorpio, thanks to a more spacious and comfortable middle row as well as a more ergonomic driving position than the Scorpio. The third row seats in both cars are absolutely worthless, even for small kids because of the horrendous ride comfort. Scorpio does provide an option of a tiny, forward-facing third row, but that too is no less than a punishment for its passengers. For cars costing more than 15 Lakh rupees, they have despicable cabins with sub-par materials and fit-finish, even compared to cars two segments below them.

Length (mm): Safari Storme – 4655, Scorpio – 4456
Width (mm): Safari Storme – 1855, Scorpio – 1820
Height (mm): Safari Storme – 1922, Scorpio – 1995

Ride Quality & Handling: 
Both cars have simply terrible dynamics, thanks to their ancient ladder-frame construction. However, even among the two, the Safari Storme has significantly better road manners than the Scorpio. It has a more pliant ride than the Scorpio, and transmits far less impact from the bumps and ruts compared to the Scorpio. Safari Storme also exhibits better stability at speed as well as under panic braking. Both cars roll like yachts, have absolutely no feel or feedback from the steering and are frankly scary to pilot around the bends. But what they can do well, is eat up bad roads, mud roads or even no-road situations, without even breaking a sweat. For the price, they are couple of the best off roader available, especially if you order them with the 4x4 option.

Ground Clearance (mm): Safari Storme – 200, Scorpio – 180

Tyre Size: 
Safari Storme – 235/70R16
Scorpio – 235/65R17 (S4 to S10), 215/75R15 (S2)

Wheelbase (mm): Safari Storme - 2650, Scorpio - 2680

Reliability and After Sales Service: 
In olden days, both Mahindra & Tata Motors used to sail in the same boat, of iffy product reliability and questionable after sales service. Back then Indica and Safari were looked at in a better light than Bolero and Scorpio. But then Mahindra started focusing on Customer Satisfaction at the Service Stations, while Tata shifted focus to development of newer platforms. Mahindra started free of charge replacement of failed parts and slowly patched up the reliability issues, establishing reasonable trust with their customers. Their gamble paid off big time allowing them to slowly increase the prices of their cars and establishing themselves as the leading UV & SUV manufacturer in the country. Meanwhile, Tata Motors' products got more and more complicated, especially the failure prone electricals became the Achilles heel of Tata products. Today Tata Motors has a lot of catching up to do, especially in terms of Customer Service provided by its thick-skinned dealers.

Resale after 5 to 7 years est. (Lakh):

Safari Storme VX – 5.50 Lakh
Scorpio S10 – 6.75 Lakh

Total Cost of Ownership (in Lakh): (Vehicle Price + Fuel Cost – Resale Value)

Safari Storme VX – 15.10 Lakh
Scorpio S10 – 12.85 Lakh

Verdict: 
Truth be told, none of these cars is worth buying. The world has moved on to lighter, more efficient, monocoque based SUVs. But if you must choose between the two, we would recommend the Safari Storme. It may not have the electronic gimmicks that the Scorpio has, but it has stronger fundamentals. It rides better than the Scorpio, feels much more stable and confident at high speeds and even corners a little better than the Scorpio. Its a close call, as the Scorpio fights back with lower Ownership Costs as well as better After Sales Service. However Safari Storme's stronger fundamentals are reason enough to tilt the balance in its favour, and that is why it is the winner of this shootout.

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